Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

Childless seniors need to build a safety net

Seniors clients without children must create a support system to help them cope in retirement in case they become incapacitated, according to Kiplinger. They should choose an agent that will oversee their care when the time comes. The agent can be a revocable trust or a family member. A team of professional advisors is also needed; including a financial planner, an accountant, an attorney and possibly a geriatric care manager. Seniors should also choose a place to live where senior-related services, transportation and health facilities are easily accessible. -- Kiplinger

How couples delude themselves about retirement

Pre-retiree couples still experience a disconnect with each other regarding their finances and retirement savings, highlighting the need for better communication between partners, according to a recent Fidelity survey. However, a T. Rowe Price survey reports how most retiree couples are able to live comfortably, about as well or even better than when they were working, with only 8% who said they are experiencing financial difficulties. The Fidelity survey also notes how more women, 22% in 2015 compared to just 9% in 2011, make the major retirement decisions for the couple while 54% of couples make retirement investment decisions together. -- Forbes

Use these 3 questions to see if your client is taking too much risk

Retirees can use these three questions to check if they are already jeopardizing their financial security by investing too aggressively. These clients should check if they have rebalanced their portfolio over the past five to six years, if they have been converting majority of their savings into stocks or going into more volatile investments and if they checked their risk tolerance recently. -- Time

To downsize or not to downsize: The retiree's question

Clients with large, multi-level houses have the choice of whether to sell or retain their homes, depending on the lifestyle they want once they retire. Retirees who live in houses with sentimental value want to leave property for their children or want to avoid any major lifestyle changes should avoid selling, advises this MSN article. On the other hand, clients who want to save money, move closer to family or spend their retirement travelling are advised to sell their houses. – MSN

Are your clients considering a robo?

Getting a robo-advisor instead of a human financial advisor in retirement planning has its pros and cons, but the right decision will still depend on a client's needs. Robo-advisors have lower fees, low minimum investment, tax strategies, portfolio balancing and less drama. However, they don't involve hand-holding, they have investment biases and heavily depend on information gathered from its intake form. -- Yahoo

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