Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

Employers to chip in more 401(k) dollars
Fifty-seven percent of global employers surveyed by Vanguard claimed they intend to boost company contributions to 401(k) plans in the next five years, according to this article on Forbes. And another 14% of the firms will make substantial increases to their contributions, the survey finds. Companies contribute to 401(k) plans by providing match contributions to their employees and making profit-sharing contributions. --Forbes

The cost of ‘not yet’ saving for retirement
Forty-five percent of non-retired Americans do not engage in retirement savings, with 36% of them planning to start building their nest egg in the coming years, according to a study by Edward Jones. Also, 10% of them have no plans of saving for the golden years, the study finds. “When it comes to retirement savings, there’s a big difference between planning to save and actually doing so. While intentions to save for retirement are legitimate, individuals tend to satisfy more immediate, short-term spending goals and push off their long-term saving goals,” said Scott Thoma, a spokesman for Edward Jones.--Fox Business

How the internet of things will transform retirement
The Internet of Things and the sharing economy pose new investment opportunities as well as a challenge for companies that provide services to retirees, writes Joseph Coughlin, director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab. The Internet of Things describes how appliances and devices "communicate" with each other via sensors and computer chips. As that converges with the sharing economy, exemplified by Zipcar, innovative services will be made possible and will make the lives of retirees safer, easier and more convenient, Couglin writes. "While new investment opportunities will emerge, these innovations may challenge existing businesses. If these novel services can extend living at home even a few months, let alone a few years–what might the impact be on the senior housing industry?"  --The Wall Street Journal

4 ‘what ifs’ that may change how clients plan for retirement
Although clients have a good retirement plan in place, they need to prepare for "what if" scenarios that can significantly alter their plan, according to this article on MarketWatch. For example, employers may reduce the pension payments that workers will receive, or there may be an emergency that can hurt their savings. For married couples, death could significantly reduce the household income and mean repercussions in their investments.  --MarketWatch

Don't give in to bond market hysteria
Bonds are likely to decline once interest rates go up, so clients are advised to assess the purpose of bonds in their portfolio and its impact in the long term, according to this article on CNNMoney. Experts have warned that rate increases are looming and will severely affect the bond market. Diversifying portfolios with short- to intermediate-term investment-grade bonds is a good investment decision for retirement investors and those who have long-term investment goals.  --CNNMoney

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