Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

How to whip your 401(k) into shape
401(k) participants who want to get their accounts into good shape are advised to start saving as soon as they can, determine the right amount to contribute, and take advantage of their employer match contribution, according to this article on U.S. News & World Report. They are also advised to know their investments within the plan, seek professional advice, and rebalance their investments regularly. 401(k) participants need to take caution about their loans and fees, automate increase in contributions, and roll their 401(k) assets with previous employers into their current plan. --Yahoo Finance

What you should know about Social Security
Full retirement age is a term used in Social Security to refer to the age at which the worker can receive the full value of retirement benefits, according to this article in The Wall Street Journal. Workers should realize that their benefit will be smaller than expected if they decide to stop working before they reach their FRA. Also, workers should know their spouses can claim a spousal benefit on their record only if they have filed for their own retirement benefits.  --The Wall Street Journal

How late-life marriage can hurt your retirement security
Older workers who intend to marry need to know that their retirement finances, including Social Security benefits, will be affected by their decision, according to this article on Time Money. While they only need one year to be eligible for the benefits, the wife should reach her full retirement age to get the full value of spousal benefit on her husband's record. Clients will also lose alimony or survivor benefits of a pension if they had been previously married, so they need to come up with a strategy to maximize their benefits, an expert says.  --Time Money

Don't let the market downturn do you in
Clients who depend on their portfolio for retirement income want safe-income investments but are forced to take riskier ones instead, according to an article on MarketWatch. This is because the Fed is implementing a low-interest-rate policy purposely to prompt investors to take investments that promise higher returns, making retirement savers a collateral damage in the event the market declines. Investors are advised to do a complete portfolio analysis and plan on what steps to take in case the market crashes.  --MarketWatch

Social Security Q&A: Should I claim on my ex's record and if so, when?
A pre-retiree is advised to wait until she reaches her full retirement age to file for a spousal benefit on her ex-husband's record, according to this article on Forbes. She may then apply for her own retirement benefit when she turns 70 to receive a higher monthly benefit value through her advance years. This strategy is not feasible if she files for a spousal or retirement benefit before reaching FRA.  --Forbes

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