Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

Make your retirement savings last a lifetime

Financial advisors and academics are helping retirees ensure their spending plans are on track by offering drawdown strategies that can adjust to age, account balance and other changing circumstances, according to this article on Kiplinger. These strategies allow retirees to make bigger withdrawals and address the risk of poor returns in the early retirement years as these approaches adapt to changing market conditions and investment returns. "The more flexibility you have to cut spending if necessary, then the higher the withdrawal rate you can start with," says Wade Pfau, a professor at The American College. –Kiplinger

5 benefits of a capital gains retirement strategy

Self-employed investors with a sizable capital-loss carryover may consider investing the funds in a diversified investment portfolio, real estate and other nonretirement plan growth investments, according to this article on MarketWatch. The strategy is recommended because it generates capital gains that can offset capital losses, allows investors to use capital losses during their lifetime, and scraps taxation of capital gains. Moreover, the option minimizes taxation of retirement plan assets and it has no limit on the amount of investments. –MarketWatch

Public pensions not expected to take a big hit from new data on longer lifespans

Unlike corporate pension plans, public pension plans are unlikely to see major financial losses as a result of new data that shows an increase in the average life span, according to this article in The Wall Street Journal. Public pension plans do not depend heavily on revised mortality rate as private plans do, and have accounted for the improvements in life expectancy in recent years. “There’s not a governmental accounting standards document saying ‘here’s the assumption to use,’” according Dale Hall of the Society of Actuaries. –The Wall Street Journal

Homes of retirees: I want it my way

A survey by Merrill Lynch/Age Wave finds that people's assumptions about where retirees prefer to live are not true, according to this article on Forbes. Eighty-three percent of seniors who moved to a new home decided to stay in the same state instead of relocating to a warmer state, according to the survey. Also, about 50% of them decided not to downsize, with 30% moving to bigger homes to accommodate family members, the survey finds. –Forbes

Retirement and risk: The difference between tolerance and capacity

Risk in retirement can be better understood by viewing it through the concepts of tolerance and capacity, according to this article on The Motley Fool. Investors can succeed in handling risk in their portfolio with the proper balancing of the two. They need to consider the timing of their investment strategies, which can have an impact on the relationship between tolerance and capacity. –The Motley Fool

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