Our cover story this month is the most important one of the year. There will be others more popular, like next month's top-advisor ranking. And while fun, even for us, that one is mostly a hit with the listed advisors, their families and (maybe) their banks.

This month's story on retirement, however, is applicable to all our readers. We focused on mass-affluent investors, which, for this story, we viewed as those with decent jobs, and some money, but not enough to be truly confident of a comfortable retirement. They can't afford to lose what they have and they can't afford to make any mistakes. In other words, your clients.

This segment is emerging in other ways, as well. Wells Fargo released a survey last month that painted a bleak picture of retirement for the middle class. The average middle class family said it would need $300,000 to retire but had saved just $25,000, according to the survey.

The categories may be drawn differently-someone else's "middle class" may not be your "mass affluent"-but the overall lesson is that most people are worried about their retirement.

Freelance writer Lauren Barack talked to advisors and other authorities about the best way to help this segment. Not surprisingly, Social Security benefits played a major part in the overall narrative. In fact, that issue is one that continues to surface, so keep an eye out for more coverage from us, both digital and print, on Social Security in the near future.

Our second feature, also on retirement, focuses on the difficulties that arise when an older client begins to show signs of dementia. Associate Editor Margarida Correia talked to the experts on the best ways to handle the situation when clients' wishes run contrary to their best interests.

To call out just one of our other good pieces, regular contributor Rick Rummage delves into the human psyche to explain that all our actions stem from one of two basic desires: to increase pleasure or avoid pain. And he tells you how a working knowledge of that concept can help you understand clients and prospects better.

Let us know what types of coverage offer you pain or pleasure and we'll incorporate appropriately.